Our tropical homestead design explained. (part 1)

    I’d like to take the opportunity to layout the design of our property and explain a little about what we have done and where we are going with this project. My partner and I live on a typical, quarter acre lot, about ten miles from downtown Miami, Florida. We share this space with one cat, one dog, and a small flock of Indian Runner ducks. When started, the property consisted of a single family home, driveway access, a 12,000 gallon swimming  pool, a pool deck, a six foot privacy fence and not much else other than a few large trees.
Site design by Eric Vocke.
The intention:
    My vision for the property was for it to operate as a living machine, providing for much of our needs and producing most of it’s own inputs. It needed to except and recycle, most if not all, waste and provide a sanctuary to local flora and fauna.
Our goals:
    It is our hope to become as food self-reliant as possible while decreasing our waste and carbon footprint. A break down of our food self-sufficiency aspirations are as follows:
  • 75%-85% of our vegetable and staple needs met
  • 50 % of our fruit needs met
  • 100% medicinal herbs
  • 40% of our non-vegetable protein needs met. This would be derived from mushrooms, duck eggs and aquaculture production.
  • 100% honey
    Maximum diversity in the garden is a must. Emergency food and water (and hopefully power someday), should be maintained in the event of a hurricane or other disaster. As well as providing for our needs, the site should be a good example of urban permaculture and demonstrate what can be accomplished on an average urban/ suburban block of land.
    The garden is laid out using a system of zones and sectors. Zone one being the most intensive to zone five basically being an untended forest or otherwise, wild area.
The design layout:
    Starting with zone zero ( the house), we exit our back kitchen door onto the pool deck where we have located our zone one kitchen garden. This consists of sixty-five grow bags on top of pallets and builder blocks, out of duck reach. We have arranged them in a keyhole configuration for easy access. Another twenty bags make up a melon tunnel between the pond and shade house. The kitchen garden produces most of the things we use daily like, salad greens and culinary herbs. Directly beside the kitchen door is a 500-gallon rain water collection tank which supplies most of our drinking water.
Kitchen garden and newly started pond conversion. Photo: Mercedes Diaz
    Directly behind the kitchen garden, to the north, is a 12,000-gallon swimming pool converted to an aquaculture fish pond. Here we raise edible fish and aquatic plants. Duck manure fertilizes zooplankton and algae which in turn feed the fish, so our only input here is the pump electricity. A custom designed reed bed system filters and aerates the pond water. Read more about the pond conversion here.
Pond reed bed and deck. Photo by Mercedes Diaz.

 

Pond(33), duck area(44) and kitchen garden(29) layout. Design by Eric Vocke.
    There is a duck house behind the pond on the edge of zone one and two. This is a deep litter system that houses a small flock of Indian Runner ducks. Directly beside the coop is a duck yard and “duckuzzi”, which we use to fertigate part of the food forest along the north border.
Molly, Ginger and Summer relaxing in the pond. Photo: Mercedes Diaz

 

    Also, in zone one, to the east of the pond, is a three hundred and fifty square foot shade house. Here we raise our seedlings and house our bath tub worm bins. The north east corner of the property is devoted to compost. Here we mostly make and turn Berkeley compost piles. Beside the compost area is a banana circle which excepts any bulky material we cannot easily compost. We hope to be adding a dry compost toilet to this area very soon.
Shade house. Phot: Mercedes Diaz

 

    Heading clockwise from the compost area, we pass a bamboo hedge which we use for crafts and trellis building. The bamboo hedge also functions as a wind break as this is our storm wind sector. Next we pass a work shop/ storage shed with a 275-gallon rainwater collection tank. Continuing along the east side of the house is the zone two trellis container garden. This consists of about one hundred grow bags with a bamboo A-frame trellis. This is our main crop garden producing: beans, tomato, and cucumber in the dry season and beans and Asian gourds in the wet season. Here there is another 275-gallon rainwater collection tote.
    Finally, as you exit the backyard,  there is a small plant nursery where tree seedling are propagated.
Kitchen garden, pond, duck coop and shade house. Photo Eric Vocke

 

    The backyard centers around the pond. Zone one is intensely managed and all the elements; pond, kitchen garden, shade house, duck house and compost area are positioned so that there is a constant and harmonious interaction between elements. Waste from the kitchen is cycled through the compost, worm bins and ducks and returned to the garden. Vegetable starts are coming from the shade house, grown on compost, on a weekly basis. We harvest, and the feedback loop continues. Read more about how we cycle nutrient through the garden here.
    In part two of this article I will be explaining the rest of the garden including the food forest, micro mango orchard, and the zone two perennial container garden. Until next time.

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